Commentary

FEEDBACK:  Comments on what to do about Confederate monuments

FEEDBACK:  Comments on what to do about Confederate monuments

Bryan Harrison, Charleston: “As a history lover and admirer of sculpture, this great-great-grandson of a Confederate soldier who owned no slaves wants peace and tranquility. A lifelong champion of civil rights, I am now being painted with same brush as Nazis and Ku Kluxers. [Charleston Mayor John] Tecklenberg’s idea and your article is a welcome statement. ” Also, letters by Ken Kammer and George Graf.

by · 09/07/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
A satellite image on Sept. 6, 2017, of Hurricane Irma approaching the U.S. coast/

MY TURN:  Disaster recovery is a long-term commitment

By Kelly E. Cruise, special to Statehouse Report  |  When a disaster strikes, we witness the horror nature can inflict on us.  The focus is often on the destroyed buildings, flooded streets or toppled trees. We see scared, displaced families, filling shelters and waiting in long lines for basic needs like water or food. It’s scary and we feel an urge to ‘do’ something.  Thank God we do. 

Cruise
When the immediate threat and rescue efforts are over and the headlines change, most of us, understandably, resume our normal routines. But for those impacted by a disaster, the story doesn’t end when the news crews leave.  It actually has just begun. Communities are left to pick up the pieces, both literally and figuratively. Recovering from a disaster takes a long time. …

BRACK:  Let’s take a new middle road on Confederate monuments

BRACK:  Let’s take a new middle road on Confederate monuments

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |   Mention the word “Confederate” these days and you sound like you’re itching for an argument.  It shouldn’t be that way.

For months across the South, there have been calls to remove Confederate monuments or to rename buildings or streets honoring long dead Confederate soldiers.  At the same time, others have said to leave the statues and names alone.

But last month in Charlottesville, Va., everything changed.  During a white nationalist rally over the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, a car plowed through a crowd, killing a 32-year woman.  Violence ensued between white nationalists and counter-protesters.  More than 30 were injured.  The governor declared a state of emergency.  A nation was stunned – and got mad.

by · 09/01/2017 · Andy Brack, Commentary
Votes on the Confederate flag and gas taxes could impact GOP primaries next year.

MY TURN:  Groups already at work to make redistricting more transparent

By Lynn Teague, special to Statehouse Report  |  It was great to see your article on the crucial importance of the process of redrawing legislative district lines after the 2020 census. Improving this process is indeed our best hope for a better legislature in South Carolina. The public needs competitive elections and candidates who speak to a broad range of citizens.

Instead, we have groups of voters selected by legislators as likely to give them the support that they need for easy re-election. This is what is known as gerrymandering. The consequences include increased polarization in our General Assembly as well as voter apathy. Why should a politician consider a wide range of public concerns if his or her election is determined by a carefully chosen group of likeminded people?

FEEDBACK:  Nothing responsive done on hate crimes, gun safety

FEEDBACK:  Nothing responsive done on hate crimes, gun safety

Judy Hines, Charleston: “On “Hate crime bill withers”:  The infamous “slippery slope” is almost always invoked when a bill is introduced that reflects the opinions of those who are disadvantaged in our present system.”

by · 08/31/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
BRACK: Redrawing political lines is best hope for better legislature

BRACK: Redrawing political lines is best hope for better legislature

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |   State lawmakers have the power to alter the way the legislature works to make it more representative of all South Carolina and, in turn, boost the potential for compromise and better outcomes for taxpayers.

But to do so, they’ll have to do something that’s very hard – hold their egos and political futures in check by redrawing district lines that are more competitive and less self-serving.

by · 08/25/2017 · Andy Brack, Commentary
FEEDBACK:  Kudos on column about Gov. Beasley, bottle bill

FEEDBACK:  Kudos on column about Gov. Beasley, bottle bill

Bill Heitsman, Darlington: “Tell Governor [David] Beasley that he needs to write a book that relates both stories of his adventures, and what he sees as the solutions to the world’s food problems.” Letters also from Bob McAlister and Tim Houghtaling.

by · 08/25/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
MY TURN: Voters can go “nuclear” to stop rewarding incompetence

MY TURN: Voters can go “nuclear” to stop rewarding incompetence

By Jim Rex, special to Statehouse Report  |  As residents of South Carolina wait patiently for the [Solicitor] David Pascoe corruption investigation of South Carolina legislators and others to reach what will almost assuredly be a repugnant and embarrassing conclusion for our state and its citizens,  we have been reminded that a culture deficient in accountability for its elected and appointed representatives will inevitably find multiple ways to set aside the interests of the many to satisfy the wishes of the few.

The nuclear plants’ fiasco in Fairfield County has proven, yet again, that too many of our elected and appointed representatives are not willing to take on powerful corporations when they take advantage of consumers and taxpayers.