Features

HISTORY: Colleton County

HISTORY: Colleton County

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  First visited by Robert Sandford in 1666 while he was reconnoitering the southeastern seaboard of North America for Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, Colleton County was one of three original counties organized in the English province of Carolina in 1682. However, Colleton was divided into three parishes by 1730 (St. Bartholomew’s, St. Paul’s, and St. John’s Colleton), which took over most county responsibilities, including oversight of elections. Lying south and west of Charleston between the Stono and Combahee Rivers, the first-manifestation Colleton was somewhat larger than its current counterpart. Colleton County, with roughly its modern functions and boundaries (shorn of St. John’s Parish, a fragment of which, the town of Edisto Beach, returned in 1975), dates from 1868, when parishes and judicial districts were abolished. The fifth-largest county in South Carolina, Colleton is bordered by Charleston, Dorchester, Bamberg, Hampton, and Beaufort Counties, and touches the Atlantic Ocean at its southeastern tip.

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Where is this downtown?

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Where is this downtown?

Here’s a downtown that you may have seen in your travels in South Carolina, but where is it?   Send your best guess to:  feedback@statehousereport.com and make sure to include your name and hometown.  If possible, write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

Water rushed in to flood the Sea Pines area of Hilton Head Island (Photo by Bruce Draper, Palmetto Electric Cooperative).

PHOTO ESSAY:  Irma pounds South Carolina

Words can only do so much to showcase the power of a major storm, such as Irma, which pounded South Carolina and the Deep South earlier this week. 

Here are a few photos provided by friends and organizations such as the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina and the S.C. Department of Transportation. Among the images:

* The Harbor River has flooded over the Sea Island Parkway (U.S. 21) at Cougar Drive on Lady’s Island on Sept. 11, 2017.

* Water rushed in to flood the Sea Pines area of Hilton Head Island.

* The Ashley River lapped up against a porch on Murray Boulevard in Charleston.

by · 09/13/2017 · Photo essay
Hurricane Hugo makes landfall in 1989.  NOAA image.

HISTORY:  Hurricanes

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The term “hurricane” comes from the West Indian word “huracan,” which means “big wind” and is used to describe severe tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and the eastern Pacific Ocean. In the western Pacific, hurricanes are known as typhoons. The development of a hurricane requires an area of low pressure in a region of favorable atmospheric and oceanic conditions. Ocean temperatures must be near or greater than 80 ̊ F and wind speeds at mid- and upper-levels of the atmosphere must be light.

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Classic building, but where?

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Classic building, but where?

This building holds some significance in South Carolina, but where is it and why is it important?  Send your best guess to:  feedback@statehousereport.com and make sure to include your name and hometown.  If possible, write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

HISTORY:  Gullah

HISTORY:  Gullah

From the S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina.

The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. Most of these slaves were brought to the area to cultivate rice since they hailed from the Rice Coast of West Africa, a region that stretches from modern Senegal to southern Liberia.

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Reflection of the past

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Reflection of the past

With lots of talk in recent weeks about statues and memorials – see more in publisher Andy Brack’s new commentary – what and where is this reflection of the past?  Is it important?  Send your best guess to:  feedback@statehousereport.com and make sure to include your name and hometown.  If possible, write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

by · 09/01/2017 · Features, Mystery Photo
Blackwood

HISTORY:  Gov. Ibra Charles Blackwood

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Born in Blackwood, Spartanburg County, on November 21, 1878, Ibra Blackwood was the son of Charles Blackwood and Louvina Burns. After graduating from Wofford College in 1898, Blackwood read law and was admitted to the bar in 1902. That same year he was elected to the General Assembly, where he represented Spartanburg County for a single term in the House.