Post Tagged with: "Brad Hutto"

NEWS:  State Senate will be a different place in January

NEWS: State Senate will be a different place in January

News analysis by Andy Brack, editor and publisher | Next year’s South Carolina Senate will be different from any convening of senators in recent memory.

Not only will there be eight new senators — nine if you include Sen. Mike Gambrell (R-Honea), who really got started just days before the Senate finished its work for this year. But the leadership of major committees will change in ways unlike anything anyone ever remembers.

“You’ve had a bigger turnover in leadership than I can ever recall,” said former Sen. John Land, D-Clarendon. “At the top before, change was always very gradual and gentle as far as replacements were concerned.”

by · 07/01/2016 · News, Politics
NEWS: Car dealers, consumers clash over closing fee

NEWS: Car dealers, consumers clash over closing fee

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher | Car dealers and consumers backed by plaintiffs’ lawyers are clashing in the General Assembly over the transparency of a closing fee paid by some consumers who bought cars a decade ago. But an attempt to remedy what some see as a problem could cause all sorts of constitutional issues, according to those familiar with the conflict.

At issue is a law enacted in 2000 by the General Assembly over “closing fees” charged to seal a deal on an automobile purchase. The law said that if dealers wanted to charge the fee, they had to pay a $10 registration fee to the state.

by · 01/15/2016 · News
NEWS: Rural roads highlight funding needs, proponents say

NEWS: Rural roads highlight funding needs, proponents say

By Andy Brack | Proponents of South Carolina spending more money to fix crumbling roads and bridges are pointing to a new report that shows the Palmetto State has the nation’s second-highest fatality rate on rural roads.

According the new study by the national transportation research group known as TRIP, South Carolina ranks behind only Connecticut in fatalities on rural roads with an average of 3.4 people killed per million vehicle miles.

The state Senate, which started debating road funding packages on the floor this week after being stalled on an anti-abortion bill, has six work days left in this year’s session.

by · 05/22/2015 · News
SCORECARD: Up for Hutto, down for Haley

SCORECARD: Up for Hutto, down for Haley

Thumbs up for Hutto, Lady Gamecocks, moped loophole; Thumbs down for DSS, Haley, bridges, 2016 ads too soon.

by · 04/03/2015 · Features, Scorecard
BRACK: A vaccine that can save women’s lives

BRACK: A vaccine that can save women’s lives

By Andy Brack | A pat on the back this week to the S.C. House for passing a bill that will save women’s lives.

For seven long years, women’s advocates have been working to get the male-centric legislature to approve a bill that would allow the state to educate and vaccinate girls — with parental permission — to protect them against a virus that causes deadly cervical cancer, a disease that kills about 4,100 women in the U.S. annually. Every month, five South Carolina women die from cervical cancer.

by · 03/20/2015 · Andy Brack, Commentary
Senators debate waste for Barnwell nuke dump

Senators debate waste for Barnwell nuke dump

By Bill Davis | Some top members of the state Senate seem to be swapping playbooks on the issue of whether to allow the Barnwell County nuclear dump to accept more radioactive waste to generate more money for state coffers.

State Sen. Brad Hutto (D-Orangeburg), who represents the area where the facility is located, is pushing for the expansion of what can be dumped in the Barnwell site.

This week, he said he would “swap” placement of some lower-level radioactive material to out-of-state sites to make room for higher-level radioactive waste.

by · 03/06/2015 · News
Hype over human trafficking justified, officials say

Hype over human trafficking justified, officials say

By Andy Brack | Human trafficking is back in the media in South Carolina because state legislators sheepishly admit they need to correct a problem with the new law, called one of the toughest in the nation. When the proposal was written — and later passed — it didn’t include a necessary provision to add jurisdiction to the State Grand Jury to allow it to use the law to thwart instances of what Attorney General Alan Wilson calls “modern-day slavery.”

by · 01/16/2015 · News