Post Tagged with: "Brian White"

NEWS BRIEFS:  New local government committee; S.C. has low excise taxes

NEWS BRIEFS:  New local government committee; S.C. has low excise taxes

A special ad hoc House committee has convened to study how the state funds local governments.

Earlier this month, Statehouse Report broke news that S.C. House Ways and Means Chairman Brian White, R-Anderson, wanted about why lawmakers want to look at how the state doles out money to counties and municipalities.

Also: A new report from the Tax Foundation shows South Carolina had the third lowest average for excise taxes – those special taxes and sales taxes on booze, smokes, gas, amusements, insurance,  utilities and more.  In other words, taxes on things a lot of people relate to fun.

by · 09/28/2017 · News, News briefs
NEWS: Battle over state’s local government fund may end soon

NEWS: Battle over state’s local government fund may end soon

By Lindsay Street, Statehouse correspondent  |  A local government group says S.C. counties are willing to lose millions of dollars of state revenue for the sake of certainty as lawmakers are poised to change the way local governments are reimbursed.

Every year since the Great Recession, counties and municipalities have received fewer state dollars, designed to help them pay for state-mandated services, such as providing space for state courts and state agencies. This has led to a lot of bad blood between legislators and local officials.

S.C. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. W. Brian White, R-Anderson, told Statehouse Report Wednesday that he will form a special committee in coming days to restructure the state’s local government fund.

by · 09/01/2017 · News
NEWS: Funding, policies target improving S.C. schools

NEWS: Funding, policies target improving S.C. schools

By Lindsay Street, Statehouse correspondent  |  As South Carolina public school students and teachers return to school this week and next, changes aimed at improving education are expected to alter the classroom and funding strategies.

A July 31 study placed South Carolina as 35th in the nation for public education. The study fingered funding as one of the reasons public school education varies from state to state. The state also tied at 46th for low ACT scores.

Highlights for this coming school year include the impact of a third grade retention policy; whether there will be more state takeovers of school districts and schools; funding for operations, buses and facilities; teacher retention; and how the state superintendent is picked.

by · 08/18/2017 · News
Allen

ALLEN: Legislators say we spend too much, but they’re spending!

By Elisabeth Allen, special to Statehouse Report | Statehouse politicians love to wax eloquent about the dangers of spending too much money on non-essential services – right before spending too much money on non-essential services.

Rep. Brian White, R-Anderson

NEWS: House to consider borrowing millions for deferred needs

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher | Days after passing an $8 billion state budget, key members of the S.C. House will meet Tuesday to figure out which projects from a $2.7 billion list of agency needs may be funded through borrowing while interest rates remain low.

The House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to meet Tuesday afternoon to consider agency capital needs for a state bond bill of about $425 million in the coming year. Borrowing that amount would increase the state’s debt service – or annual payment to borrow the money – by about $42 million a year. State officials, however, say that cost can be covered without adding to the state’s overall debt service budget because lawmakers have been aggressive in recent years in paying off high-interest and other debt, which frees up hundreds of millions of dollars of borrowing capacity now without lots of budget pain.

by · 03/17/2017 · News
NEWS:  School for at-risk students is at risk in bigger state budget

NEWS: School for at-risk students is at risk in bigger state budget

By Bill Davis, senior editor | The news this budget season isn’t so rosy for the John de la Howe School, a public residential school in McCormick for at-risk students.

The House committee version of the proposed 2017-18 state budget that will be debated next week calls for all state money to be cut to the school, which was founded in 1797. It is the “second longest standing” educational institution in the Carolinas.

This year’s $8 billion budget package also calls for the school’s agriculture program and classes to be picked up and covered by Clemson University. School supporters say they’ll try to block efforts to cut funding.

The total amount of the proposed 2017-18 state budget — comprised of General Fund tax dollars, federal pass-through dollars and “other” fees and funds such as tuition — will hit $27 billion starting in July. That’s close to a 3 percent increase over the state’s current combined budget.

by · 03/10/2017 · News
NEWS: This ‘Black Friday’ could stretch for years in state budgeting

NEWS: This ‘Black Friday’ could stretch for years in state budgeting

How much: $2.2 billion + “a whole lot more” every year

By Bill Davis, senior editor | South Carolina is looking at a massive shortage of revenues in the face of mounting annual needs that could affect taxation and programs such as K-12 education, roads and more.

How much does the state need annually that it doesn’t currently bring in? More than $2 billion more a year – every year — Statehouse insiders said.

In fact after years of ignoring the magnitude of the state’s growing challenges from roads to education to health care, things have gotten so big that one key state lawmaker joked it might take a Christmas miracle to make things right.

by · 11/25/2016 · News
NEWS: House, Senate find a lot of budgetary common ground

NEWS: House, Senate find a lot of budgetary common ground

A news analysis by Bill Davis, senior editor | The biggest unseen and immeasurable line item in the forthcoming legislative budget bill will be the amounts of unanimity between the state House and Senate.

Yes, the state Senate this week approved its $7.5 billion general budget package in a near-record four hours. And, yes, that chamber could have posted an even faster time if it weren’t for some last-second grandstanding from Sen. Lee Bright (R-Roebuck) regarding who can use what bathroom.

But what really stood out this week, according to legislators from the Senate and House, was how closely the Senate budget plan mirrored the House version.

by · 05/06/2016 · News