Post Tagged with: "history"

FEEDBACK:  On protecting the SNAP program; Remembering the past

FEEDBACK:  On protecting the SNAP program; Remembering the past

Pat Walker, North Charleston: “Although food insecurity affects more than 17 percent of people in South Carolina, it is often hard to see.  When a child can’t focus at school because they didn’t have dinner the night before or breakfast that morning, it isn’t always clear that hunger is driving their distraction – but it is oftentimes the culprit.”

Also: Bryan Harrison of Charleston on remembering the past.

by · 10/06/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
HISTORY:  Gullah

HISTORY:  Gullah

From the S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina.

The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. Most of these slaves were brought to the area to cultivate rice since they hailed from the Rice Coast of West Africa, a region that stretches from modern Senegal to southern Liberia.

BRACK:  Let’s take a new middle road on Confederate monuments

BRACK:  Let’s take a new middle road on Confederate monuments

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |   Mention the word “Confederate” these days and you sound like you’re itching for an argument.  It shouldn’t be that way.

For months across the South, there have been calls to remove Confederate monuments or to rename buildings or streets honoring long dead Confederate soldiers.  At the same time, others have said to leave the statues and names alone.

But last month in Charlottesville, Va., everything changed.  During a white nationalist rally over the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, a car plowed through a crowd, killing a 32-year woman.  Violence ensued between white nationalists and counter-protesters.  More than 30 were injured.  The governor declared a state of emergency.  A nation was stunned – and got mad.

by · 09/01/2017 · Andy Brack, Commentary
Chris William, right, on the set of the public television show he anchors, Carolina Business Review.  (Photo provided.)

WILLIAM: A convention of reason

By Chris William, special to Statehouse Report | Like so many people these days, I am struck by the acute fury behind, as well as the overt dismissiveness of, today’s politics and public conversations. And frankly, what we just plain expect from each other.

Smart people who are normally kind, generous, and charitable will explosively and vehemently oppose and even personally attack others who don’t agree with their views. A Jekyll/Hyde effect.

Father Richard Rohr, a Franciscan monk, laughingly labels present-day political opposites as “the secular arrogance of the Left and the fundamental silliness of the Right.”

by · 11/06/2016 · Commentary, My Turn
HISTORY:  Allendale County

HISTORY: Allendale County

S.C. Encyclopedia | Formed in 1919, Allendale is South Carolina’s youngest county, yet it contains the oldest known human habitation in the state. Archaeological investigations in Allendale have found evidence of human settlement dating back more than sixteen thousand years. These prehistoric people used “Allendale Chert” in making stone tools.

Edisto Island

HISTORY: Edisto Island, S.C.

S.C. Encyclopedia | Located between the mouths of the North and South Edisto Rivers south of Charleston, Edisto Island is a Lowcountry Sea Island of approximately sixty-eight square miles. The island is shielded from the Atlantic Ocean by Edisto Beach, a barrier island municipality contained in Colleton County and linked to Edisto Island by a causeway.

HISTORY:  John Martin Pike

HISTORY: John Martin Pike

S.C. Encyclopedia | The Rev. John Martin Pike, a clergyman, editor and publisher, was born in Newfoundland, Canada, in June 1840, the son and brother of Arctic explorers. Educated in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, he graduated from Mount Allison Wesleyan College and Seminary in Sackville, Nova Scotia. Ordained in 1868, Pike served Wesleyan Methodist and Methodist Church of Canada parishes in the Maritime Provinces. About 1873, he married Marry S. Pike, a Nova Scotia native. The couple had seven children.

HISTORY:  Hispanics in S.C.

HISTORY: Hispanics in S.C.

S.C. Encyclopedia | Hispanics are among South Carolina’s oldest and most recent immigrant groups. Long before English settlers founded colonies in the Massachusetts Bay, Spanish explorers laid claim to territory in what is now the United States from the Atlantic to the Pacific. From bases of operation in the Caribbean and Mexico, Spanish emissaries established presidios and missions to protect Spain’s northern colonial frontier.