Post Tagged with: "Lindsay Street"

BRIEFS: South Carolina’s failing grade plus a great digital resource

BRIEFS: South Carolina’s failing grade plus a great digital resource

The Palmetto State’s low jobless rate and huge economic development victories over the years haven’t been enough for it to escape being named the nation’s worst on jobs and business, according to a new Prosperity Now scorecard.

More than one-third of jobs in the state pay less than $24,250 per year, and the average annual pay in the state is $46,411, the report said.. The data earned the state an “F”.

The Prosperity Now scorecard gave South Carolina an F grade based on 60 outcome measures from savings and graduation rates to homeownership and health care.  

BRIEFS: GOP’s McKissick criticized; Street is new correspondent

BRIEFS: GOP’s McKissick criticized; Street is new correspondent

Staff reports  |  New S.C. GOP Chairman Drew McKissick is getting roundly criticized for cavalierly saying he would turn over voter information that a seemingly partisan presidential commission wants after the S.C. Election Commission said it wouldn’t turn over the info.  Some 44 states have reportedly refused to hand over the information.

FEEDBACK:  Readers say it’s time to change rules for nurse practitioners

FEEDBACK: Readers say it’s time to change rules for nurse practitioners

From Helen Ngigi, Smyrna: This new legislation S.C. Senate bill 345 would go a long way in reducing costs to the state of S.C., and keep patients out of the emergency room. This bill is very important in helping improve the health of all patients, especially those in rural areas. Nurse practitioners have a proven record of providing quality care to their patients with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma, among others.” Other letters from Dr. John MacLaurin and nurse Alison MacLeod

by · 03/10/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
NEWS: Relaxing rules on nurse practitioners could cut health costs, advocates say

NEWS: Relaxing rules on nurse practitioners could cut health costs, advocates say

By Lindsay Street, contributing writer | Giving more autonomy to nurse practitioners will help cut health care costs and improve access to health care, particularly in rural areas, say proponents of a Senate bill pushing for changes. Others say it’s just not that simple.

In South Carolina, nurse practitioners are licensed primary care professionals who operate under the supervision of a medical doctor. The new legislation, S.C. Senate bill 345, would still require a doctor’s supervision of a nurse’s practice, but would allow doctors to supervise more than three nurse practitioners at a time, remove a geographical radius tied to the doctor’s location and allow nurse practitioners to prescribe drugs. The legislation would expand autonomy of certified nurse midwives as well.

by · 03/03/2017 · News
NEWS:  Do term limits work?

NEWS: Do term limits work?

News analysis by Lindsay Street, contributing writer | On Tuesday, state Rep. Joshua Putnam, an Anderson Republican first elected in 2011, will find out whether he will be able to introduce a bill in the legislature to limit the terms of all House and Senate members.

To move forward, all he has to do is best Democratic challenger Anna Brown at the polls — a feat that might not be that much of a heavy lift following three waves of GOP gerrymandering over 22 years that has made the district favorable to Putnam.

Across the country, the notion of limiting elected officials’ length of service, which has been hibernating in policy circles in recent years, is back in vogue thanks to a national ill will toward career politicians blamed for increasing dysfunction at all levels of government.

by · 11/04/2016 · News
NEWS:  Big Winthrop grant seeks strategies to boost English proficiency

NEWS: Big Winthrop grant seeks strategies to boost English proficiency

By Lindsay Street, contributing writer | Some Upstate teachers and school administrators now have access to federal funds to meet the challenge of a burgeoning population of students not proficient in English.

The money — $3 million over five years — will be used to create curriculum and strategies that can be used across the state.

More than 30 languages are spoken at York County School District 3. In the nearby Lancaster County School District, students speak more than a dozen languages. At one Upstate school, there are as many as 100 students not proficient in English.

by · 10/21/2016 · News
NEWS: When skill sets don’t match workforce requirements

NEWS: When skill sets don’t match workforce requirements

By Lindsay Street, contributing correspondent | The state’s top educators say all the elements are in place for creating a South Carolina workforce that matches the labor market, but there’s still a disparity between the two.

The 2015 annual report, titled “S.C. labor overeducated for majority of jobs,” by the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce illustrates gaps in skills that remain between workforce and labor demands.

According to the DEW report, South Carolina has an “oversupply” of labor with some college or a bachelor of the arts degrees and not enough labor with technical degrees that are in demand.

by · 08/12/2016 · News
NEWS: Lawmakers say there’s still work at DSS

NEWS: Lawmakers say there’s still work at DSS

By Lindsay Street, contributing writer | The state’s embattled child welfare agency, emboldened by more funding and staffing, is doing more investigations for child abuse and neglect, but officials say there’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.

“I don’t know if there’s a single fix to any of this,” said outgoing Democratic Sen. Joel Lourie of Columbia, one of three senators on a state Department of Social Services oversight panel. “I think it’s just continuing to work with the agency and holding them accountable.

“We still see child deaths at a high level … but you have to judge this looking as to where we are based on where we were and what we were experiencing two years ago was an absolute disaster in crisis. I’ve never seen anything like it in my time in public service.”

by · 07/29/2016 · News