Post Tagged with: "litter"

FEEDBACK:  Kudos on column about Gov. Beasley, bottle bill

FEEDBACK:  Kudos on column about Gov. Beasley, bottle bill

Bill Heitsman, Darlington: “Tell Governor [David] Beasley that he needs to write a book that relates both stories of his adventures, and what he sees as the solutions to the world’s food problems.” Letters also from Bob McAlister and Tim Houghtaling.

by · 08/25/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
FEEDBACK:  State should consider bottle bill for roads

FEEDBACK:  State should consider bottle bill for roads

Frank Scalise, Powdersville: I believe the State of South Carolina has to consider a bottle bill and an increased tax on fast food. All proceeds of unreturned bottles and fast food tax should go to road clean-up with county and local roads as the main focus of clean-up. Just as not everyone has children in school but still is taxed to provide an educated society for our future, not everyone litters but we need to do something to provide a clean planet for our future.

by · 08/18/2017 · Commentary, Feedback
MY TURN: Let’s clean up our state and become litter-free

MY TURN: Let’s clean up our state and become litter-free

By Sarah Lyles and Mallory Biering, special to Statehouse Report  |  Litter is a passionate subject. Either one is vehemently against it or one is decidedly apathetic.

Whichever side you lean on, it can’t be denied.  Litter affects all of us. While our Main Streets and interstates get cleaned regularly, our side streets and rural roads are continually treated as a travelers’ trash can. Whether litter is intentionally dumped or accidentally flies out of an unsecured or improperly covered load, it needs to be addressed in a number of ways. Ideally that timeline would involve enforcement of state or local litter laws, a citation to the guilty party, fine levied by the judge and finally pick up.

An urban farmers market in downtown Havana.  Photo by Andy Brack.

BRACK: S.C. can learn a few things from Cuba

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher | For as long Americans not old enough to be in the AARP have been alive, Cuba has been a pariah, a non-democratic experiment whose embarrassing Soviet connections caused a geo-political chess game.

But as Soviet regimes crumbled in the early 1990s, Cuba was left hanging, still isolated and cut off from its rich neighbor to the north. Cubans literally lost weight, as food became harder to get. But its economic crisis forced institutional changes. The Cuba of today isn’t the Cuba of the Cold War.

by · 09/04/2015 · Andy Brack, Commentary